A Mixture of Tasks in Ceredigion

New and Repaired Fences

New and Repaired Fences

Coed Penglanowen's Welcome Sign

Coed Penglanowen's Welcome Sign

Several more days have been spent in the stables area at Cors Ian. We have now started shoring up and mending the remaining blocks using materials from the sections taken down.  This is quite a time consuming task. We’ve also mended a section of fence along the boundary to keep our grazing animals in and next door’s out!

Coed Maidie now has some new fence and some mended fence. We have double fenced the top meadow to allow it to be grazed and also mended the fence along the track that allows the cattle to get to the meadow without escaping into the wood. A short section along the path in the wood was also given some attention. Whilst spending time in this area we saw lots of signs of deer (droppings, slots and tracks) and on our deer damage survey (we undertake these annually) in the least visited area of the woodland found quite a few trees that had been nibbled recently, luckily they seem to prefer holly (which there is plenty of and grows quickly) though beech and hazel are also browsed. This can kill the tree. They can also browse the new growth on coppiced trees, so it is something we keep an eye on.

After over a decade the welcome and interpretation signs at Coed Penglanowen needed some maintenance. With the new bridge, and therefore new access, a new sign and leaflet box were also needed. With most of the volunteers away one week or preferring the other work day, it was a good opportunity to get this done (it’s a job for only a couple of people).

The Roadside Verge Reserves (designated either to protect or enhance their botanical interest) have been remarked prior to the cutting season.  These will not be cut until September when the cuttings will also be collected to allow the flowers to seed and prevent nutrient build up. There were amazing displays of bluebells on many of the verges, both reserves and not.