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Drostre Wood

Drostre Wood stitchworts

Drostre Wood is a small mixed deciduous woodland containing oak and birch. Below the canopy of the tallest trees there is a wide range of smaller tree species including aspen, elder, yew, hawthorn, blackthorn and rowan, with shrubs such as holly and honeysuckle.

Cae Pwll y Bo

Cae Pwll y Bo globeflowers

This small damp meadow is known for its spectacular display of globeflowers.

The reserve is all that remains of a much larger field that was originally part of Pwll y Bo farm (Hobgoblin pool in Welsh).

Vicarage Meadows

Vicarage Meadows west field and scabious

This wildflower-rich meadow and wet pasture is set on the side of a hill in the Irfon valley and lies adjacent to the Nant Irfon National Nature Reserve.

Many years ago, the local vicarage owned Vicarage Meadows. The fields provided a hay crop and a place to graze horses and cows. The small stone barn was used as a shelter for milking cows.

We continue to use traditional management methods with a hay crop being taken off one field and Exmoor ponies grazing the whole site, giving the reserve’s many wildflowers the chance to flourish.

Allt Rhongyr

Allt Rhongyr

Allt Rhongyr is within the Brecon Beacons National Park, adjacent to Craig y Rhiwarth Nature Reserve and offers dramatic views of the Tawe Valley. It features a diverse mix of limestone grassland, acidic grassland and woodland and it was once the site of an iron age hillfort. The site is now managed by grazing under an agri-environment scheme.

Coed Dyrysiog

Coed Dyrysiog bluebells

A beautiful area of ancient woodland and unusually a registered common that slopes down to the banks of the Nant Bran.

This is a lovely place to come for a peaceful woodland walk with just the sound of the Nant Bran below you and the woodland birds above you.

Pwll-y-Wrach

Pwll-y-Wrach waterfall

Important Notice

Please note that until further notice, some of the paths on this nature reserve will soon be closed to public access. This is due to the presence of Ash Dieback in the trees.

This is the Trust’s most visited nature reserve in the Brecknock area and was extended in 2012 to double its original size, with the help of a grant from the Countryside Council for Wales.

It is 17.5 hectares of beautiful ancient woodland, which slopes down to the banks of the River Enig. Near the eastern end of the reserve the river plunges over a spectacular waterfall into a dark pool below, known as the “Witches Pool” from which the reserve gets it name.