Cwm Colhuw Nature Reserve gets funding boost

Cwm Colhuw Nature Reserve gets funding boost

This stunning 12 hectare nature reserve, near Llantwit Major, is managed by the Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales. This limestone grassland, which also has ash woodland and coastal scrub, is a rare habitat in Wales and the reserve is now benefitting from additional funding to help preserve and manage it for the benefit of wildlife and people.

 

Painted Lady by Bob Coyle

Painted Lady by Bob Coyle

The reserve offers an important habitat for a variety of wildlife including hedgehogs, slow worms, birds such as linnet, whitethroat and bullfinch and a range of butterflies from the small blue butterfly to the painted lady. The reserve is also famous for its Iron Age Promontory Fort, located on top of the sea cliffs.

With the help from Environment Wales and Biffa Award, WTSWW are now able to create and manage more important wildlife habitat and improve footpaths at this locally important site. They are aiming to restore the grasslands and create open areas for flowers and insects to enjoy. In conjunction with this, the Wildlife Trust will be improving access, undertaking scientific surveys and running community events such as bat walks and moth trapping sessions.

Vaughn Matthews, Conservation Officer said:

 

Cwm Colhuw by Vaughn Matthews

Cwm Colhuw by Vaughn Matthews

“Improved access to and on the reserve will result in more people being able to enjoy and appreciate wildlife as well as allow us to better manage the reserve. A water trough has been installed and a small number of livestock will soon be present to help restore the grassland.”

If you would like to get involved with the nature reserve in any way then the Wildlife Trust wants to hear from you! There are many opportunities on the reserve; ranging from practical management to helping raise important funds for the reserve. There will also be a programme of events that will be open to all.

If you are interested in helping the Wildlife Trust at the Cwm Colhuw Nature Reserve or want to find out more details, please contact Vaughn Matthews (v.matthews@welshwildlife.org). I look forward to hearing from you!

Notes:

Contact Lyndsey Maiden l.maiden@welshwildlife.org 07799 050805 or Vaughn Matthews v.matthews@welshwildlife.org 01656 724100.

Photos must be credited and are for one time use only.

The Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales (WTSWW) owns and manages over 80 nature reserves in Wales, covering thousands of hectares of important wildlife habitat. One of their finest reserves is Cwm Colhuw in the Vale of Glamorgan, situated 1km southwest of Llantwit Major.

Limestone or calcareous grasslands are developed on shallow lime-rich soils generally overlying limestone rocks, including chalk. These grasslands are now largely found on distinct topographic features such as escarpments/cliffs or dry valley slopes and sometimes on ancient earthworks in landscapes strongly influenced by the underlying limestone geology.