Living Landscapes

Pumlumon landscape

“Living Landscapes” is one of the most ambitious conservation plans in British history.

‘Living Landscapes’ is The Wildlife Trusts’ vision for our collective future. It is a future where wildlife thrives across Wales- in farmland, woodland, wetland, and even our towns and cities.

It is a place where the landscape allows wildlife to move in response to changing conditions and where everyone has access to wild places and the opportunity to enjoy their local wildlife.

Cliffs near Ogmore by Lizzie Wilberforce

Cliffs near Ogmore by Lizzie Wilberforce

The Wildlife Trusts reach their centenary in 2012, and The Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales has been active for around 75 years in west Wales and over 50 years in Glamorgan. In this time, much of our work has focused on the acquisition and management of nature reserves. Read more about the history of the movement and our conservation priorities.

However, outside these nature reserves, wildlife continued to decline. For this reason, if we hope to achieve our vision of Living Landscapes, we have to think outside the boundaries of our nature reserves.

We have to take bold steps to restore, reconnect and recreate our landscape, in order to protect our wildlife- most importantly, for its inherent value and our moral duty to protect it, but also because the health and well-being of the environment is what secures the future of our own health and well-being as well.

Ystwyth valley by Lizzie Wilberforce

Ystwyth valley by Lizzie Wilberforce

What we know for certain is that our current system isn’t working. So, to address this, The Wildlife Trusts have set up a seven stage approach to changing that. At WTSWW we are in the process of developing our own approach to delivering Living Landscapes in South West Wales. We are already active in the landscape-scale Mid Wales Red Squirrel Project and are currently developing a project around the Cardigan area.

Our work doesn’t stop at the shoreline. The Wildlife Trusts also have a vision for Living Seas, where wildlife thrives from the depths of the ocean to the coastal shallows.

  • Anti-social behaviour at Teifi Marshes…again!
    Since lockdown restrictions have eased in Wales, there has sadly been a surge in anti-social behaviour at Teifi Marshes nature reserve, the home of The Wildlife Trust’s Welsh Wildlife Centre. Unfortunaley, youths are gathering in our nature reserve bird hides and playing loud music, drinking and taking drugs. Grazing ponies have been let out of fields ...
  • Red Squirrels in Clywedog!Red Squirrels in Clywedog!
    Red squirrels have been surviving in an isolated area of mid Wales since before the incursion of American Greys. The Mid Wales Red Squirrel Partnership was founded in 2002 to protect our native red squirrels and learn more about them. Since then, the partnership has discovered a unique mid Wales haplotype through DNA work- proving ...
  • Picture perfect. Images of Wales to help fundraise for the Trust!Picture perfect. Images of Wales to help fundraise for the Trust!
    Photographer and Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales (WTSWW) Trustee, Mike Alexander has kindly decided to make all of his wonderful photographs available, via his website, to any organisation or individual who is prepared to make a donation to WTSWW. Mike tells us about using his photo’s to raise vital funds and the need to ...
  • Anti-social behaviour on Nature Reserves during lockdown!Anti-social behaviour on Nature Reserves during lockdown!
    While the majority of people respect our precious nature reserves, unfortunately  a minority do not. This can take up a lot of time for our Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales (WTSWW) staff dealing with the consequences of their anti-social behaviour. This usually involves littering, which before Covid19, was managed with the help of volunteers. ...
  • Covid -19 Update and FutureCovid -19 Update and Future
    An Update from Sarah Kessell CEO of The Wildlife Trust of South and West Wales We earn around half of our income through tourism, which has been switched off since the lockdown began. The financial hit has meant that we will need to find at least £500k in additional income or savings for this year. We ...
  • Garden Wildlife Filming – Top Hints & Tips!Garden Wildlife Filming  - Top Hints & Tips!
    Camera traps are wildly used by our Conservation team as part of species monitoring, they are also a great way to see what wildlife is out and about, day and night, when it’s quiet in your gardens. Unlike our Wildlife Trust Conservation team’s equipment, the cameras I use as part of the Education programme are at ...
  • From the archive: Carmel nature reserve, 30 years on!
    The strange world of lockdown has prompted us to spend time taking a bit of a journey back through our publications archive. We thought it was a great opportunity to re-visit and share some of the work the Trust has done in the past, and the paths by which those foundations have led us to ...
  • In Memory of Margaret Perring 1933 – 2020
    Margaret Perring (nee Barrow), who was a loyal member of the Wildlife Trust, sadly died at the beginning of April. Margaret was born in Maesteg on 14th May 1933 and was head girl at Maesteg Grammar School before going on to read Biology at Leeds University.  Here she developed an interest in botany and after several ...
  • Limpets at Frenchman’s Steps, PembrokeshireLimpets at Frenchman’s Steps, Pembrokeshire
    John Archer-Thomson was studying limpets in Pembrokeshire before the Sea Empress grounded in 1996. Here he tells the story of his work on the coastal ecology before and since the disaster, and the wider impacts of man’s activities on the two seashore species. I have been studying the population of limpets on a rocky shore called ...
  • Our conservation storyOur conservation story
    The conservation pioneers By the 1960s, in response to the widespread devastation of our natural habitats, Wildlife Trusts had been formed across the length and breadth of the UK. Ancient woodlands, wildflower meadows, lakes, mosses, moors, islands, estuaries and beaches were all rescued in an urgent drive to save our natural heritage for future generations. Our founders successfully pressed for laws to ...
  • Recent declinesRecent declines
    Whilst we have seen some great success stories in Wales- the acquisition and management of new nature reserves and designated areas, the recovery of the otter- all is not well and many species and habitats continue to decline. Outside our protected areas, habitats have been lost on an unprecedented scale. Across Britain, 97% of our wildflower meadows ...
  • Securing our own futureSecuring our own future
    Nature isn’t a luxury: our environment underpins the economy. All species and their habitats have inherent value, and The Wildlife Trusts will always work to protect them and inspire others to do the same. However a thriving and functioning environment is also what helps us to survive. With the country facing unprecedented economic uncertainty and pressures for energy generation, ...