Meadow creation at Pwll Waun Cynon

Pwll Waun Cynon meadow mowing by Graham Watkeys

Pwll Waun Cynon meadow mowing by Graham Watkeys

Biffa AwardEight people (and an imaginary dog, a Lurcher as it happens) went to mow, and after a day removing dense and encroaching bramble and scrub from one half of Pwll Waun Cynon, the general reaction was “Good lord it's a field!!!” (or language to that effect).

Actually thanks to a Biffa Award grant it's now a proto-meadow; or if you want to be quantum - the wave form for species rich grassland is in the process of collapsing, (or in the unlikely event you happen to be an ungulate you're probably metaphorically rubbing your hooves together thinking nom nom nom), or if you're a volunteer used to a brush cutter, saw and loppers you're probably thinking where the hell has that tractory thing with the magic spinny cutty thing been all this time.

Mowing Pwll Waun Cynon (photo by Chris Lawrence)

Mowing Pwll Waun Cynon (photo by Chris Lawrence)

The ultimate aim when the alien invasive Japanese Knotweed and Himalayan Balsam are removed and the other encroaching plants and trees are cleared is to use conservation grazing to create and maintain species rich meadow, an important habitat that has seen massive declines due to changes in land use and modern intensive farming methods.

Graham Watkeys Taf Fechan Volunteer Warden