Archives

Allt Crug Garn between Pennant and Cilcennen, Ceredigion

Emperor moths by Zorba the Greek shared under Creative Commons licence

Grid References: O.S. Explorer map 199 Lampeter. Main entrance; SN517617, Site centre; SN518617
Status: None
Tenure: Leased from the Forestry Commission in 1965, the site was subsequently purchased in 1986.
Size: 0.38 ha (0.94 acres)

A downloadable version of this leaflet is available for printing from here

Vegetation Tick Lists for the Ceredigion reserves are available to download as Excel xlsx or Excel xls

Location and Access Notes

Public transport: There are no buses to the reserve

Take B4337 from Llanrhystud, turn west on unsigned road at SN541625. First right after 4.5km and 400m takes you to Crug Garn farm gate. Access is opposite Crug Garn Farm entry, where there is space for one car and one opposite but take care on the soft verge. Follow the track to the left to the wire fence surrounding the reserve. No access for wheelchairs.

Emperor moths by Zorba the Greek shared under Creative Commons licence

Emperor moths by Zorba the Greek shared under Creative Commons licence

Description: Relic lowland heathland with oak and birch invasion.

The southern third of the site contains the remains of an old plantation, while the northern two thirds is made up of tall old heathland growing on 80cm of peat.

Heather should show a cyclical succession where pioneer, building, senescent, and degenerating stages give way to one another over a 30-50 year period. Studies on this site, since 1976, indicates that there is very little heather regeneration, but instead a considerable successional pressure. Western Gorse (7-11) has invaded the site followed by Birch, Rowan (5-6) and Willow with a further threat from Beech.

The senescent Heather (8-10) bushes show a classic sequence of lichens and bryophytes around their bases, including 7 species of Parmelia, 2 Ramalina, and Unsea florida, the latter indicating particularly clean air quality. Narrow buckler fern (Dryopteris carthusiana) is also present.

There is also an unusual fungi association to be found. False Truffle Elaphonomyces muricatus occur in the leaf litter amongst the Birch, together with their fungal parasite the Club fungus Cordiceps ophioglossoides, whose striking fruiting bodies show up amongst the carpet of green moss, Dicranum scoparium. Invertebrates include the Emperor moth.

Return to the Ceredigion Reserves page

Map of Allt Crug Garn

 

Allt Pencnwc, Ystrad Aeron, Ceredigion

Great Spotted Woodpecker Bob Coyle

Grid References: O.S. Explorer map 199 Lampeter. Main entrance: SN518556, Site centre: SN519556
Status: None
Tenure: Leased from 1988, and subsequently purchased in 1992.
Size: 4.4 ha (10.9 acres)

A downloadable version of this leaflet for printing is available from here

Vegetation Tick Lists for the Ceredigion reserves are available to download as Excel xlsx or Excel xls 

Great Spotted Woodpecker Bob Coyle

Great Spotted Woodpecker Bob Coyle

Location and Access Notes

Public transport: Bus T1 stops in Ystrad Aeron/Theatre Felinfach, the reserve is then approx. 1 km on foot.

Roadside parking on B4342. No footpaths and steep woodland; not accessible for wheelchairs.

Description: This relatively long and narrow reserve comprises a steep, ancient semi-natural woodland that drops from improved pasture to the north, down to the Afon Gwili which runs along the southern boundary.

Quite large Oak trees form the greater part of the canopy, and the reserve has a particularly attractive spring ground flora, with carpets of Lesser Celandine (3-5) and Wood Sorrel (4-5). Bluebells (4-6) are also present. Woodland birds include Nuthatch and Great Spotted Woodpecker.

Return to the Ceredigion Reserves page

Caeau Llety Cybi, Llangybi, Ceredigion

Greater Butterfly Orchid by Philip Precey

Grid References: O.S. Explorer map 199 Lampeter. Main entrance: SN603534, Site centre: SN603535
Status: Notified SSSI
Tenure: Purchased in 1981 with funds from the Trust’s Orchid Appeal, and grant aid from NCC and WWF.
Size: 3.1 ha (7.6 acres)

A downloadable version of this leaflet for printing is available to download from here and a full colour leaflet for Caeau Llety Cybi is available here

Vegetation Tick Lists for the Ceredigion reserves are available to downlaod as Excel xlsx or Excel xls 

Location and Access Notes

Public transport: The 588 runs from Lampeter or Aberystwyth to Llangybi.

1 km north-west of Llangybi. Approach along unclassified road to Llwyn-y-groes from the A485 at Llangybi. Parking by arrangement at Cilgwyn Golf Course. Reserve access via steps at NE corner of reserve or by gate 200m along private lane to Llety-cybi Cottage. Not accessible to wheelchairs. No formal footpaths, but open access.

Greater Butterfly Orchid by Philip Precey

Greater Butterfly Orchid by Philip Precey

Description: Steep neutral lowland meadows, enclosed and divided by ancient and species rich hedgerows.

The reserve consists of four small herb-rich fields of neutral grassland showing some acidic characteristics. It is likely that the relatively steep gradient saved this site from the plough, and thus it has retained botanical interest. The sward is made up of Sweet Vernal Grass, Common Bent, and Heath-grass with a wealth of flowers, such as Bird’s-foot Trefoil (4-9), Black Knapweed (6-9), Burnet Saxifrage (5-10), Cat’s Ear (6-10), Ivy-leaved Bellflower (7-10), Pignut (5-7), Red Clover (4-10), Tormentil (4-9), Betony (6-9) and Greater Butterfly Orchid (5-7), the latter a rarity in Ceredigion. In 2005, 298 spikes of the Orchid were counted.

The fields are surrounded by rich hedgerows, which contain young standard trees. The site is also rich in waxcap fungi, probably a result of the historic lack of ploughing and fertilisation.

Return to the Ceredigion Reserves page

Cardigan Island, Gwbert, Ceredigion

Fulmar by Bob Coyle

Grid References: O.S. Explorer map 198 Cardigan and New Quay. Site centre: SN160515
Status: A notified SSSI which in turn is part of the European Natura 2000 site, the Cardigan Bay Special Area for Conservation (SAC). The whole Island is designated as a Scheduled Ancient Monument, SAM.
Tenure: Leased by the West Wales Field Club from 1944, it was subsequently purchased by the Trust in 1963 with grant aid from WWF.
Size: 15.6 ha (38.5 acres)

A downloadable version of this leaflet for printing is available from here

Location and Access Notes

Public transport: Not applicable

Access: Restricted. This site can only be accessed by chartered boat from Cardigan or Gwbert. The landing on the north end is only usable in calm weather, and particularly dangerous in northerly winds. Easterlies do not affect it since it is sheltered by the adjacent headland, and it is possible to ferry parties across from there or at Gwbert beach. Please contact the Trust for permission to visit  01656 724100.

Fulmar by Bob Coyle

Fulmar by Bob Coyle

Description: An island consisting of maritime cliff and slope and grassland plateau, adjacent to northern shore of estuary of river Teifi. There are good views from Cemaes Head & Cardigan Island Farm Park.

The island has had a long history of human use; a turf wall encloses the site of an early Christian Cell. The vegetation has altered dramatically since the 1950s, and only small areas of comparable flora remain on the north-west cape. One factor was soil erosion due to an infestation of Brown Rats, which arrived as the result of the wreck of the steamer Herefordshire in 1934. These were eradicated in the late 1960s with aid from MAFF pest officers.

The only other mammals on the island, Soay Sheep, were introduced in 1944 from the Duke of Bedford’s flock at Woburn. Numbers have fluctuated in the past but have gone down drastically in recent years, possibly because of genetic problems with inbreeding.

The vegetation can be divided into four communities: almost pure Rye Grass at the western end; more diverse Fescue-Sorrel tusk grassland in the centre with extensive patches of Bluebells (4-6) and Yorkshire Fog, and a richer Fescue grassland at the eastern end; maritime cliff vegetation with Tree Mallow (5-9) to the east, richer vegetation on the northern promontory and adjacent gully with Sea Mayweed (7-8) and Spring Squill (4-5).

The breeding seabird assemblage is dominated by gulls, including an increasing population of Herring Gulls, circa 1400 pairs of Lesser Black-backed Gulls (data from 2004 survey), and up to 20 pairs of Great Black-backed Gulls. Razorbills began to breed in 1982. Other birds breeding include Guillemot, Chough, Fulmar, Shag, Oystercatcher, Raven, and Rock Pipit. Canada and Barnacle Geese also use the island. Grey Seals breed in the sea caves.

Return to the Ceredigion Reserves page

 

Coed Maidie B. Goddard, Llechryd, Ceredigion

Gatekeeper butterfly by Margaret Holland

Grid References: O.S. Explorer map 185 Newcastle Emlyn. Main entrance: SN208438, Site centre: SN210437
Tenure: The original 21.7 acres were bought in 1990 from Geoffrey William Lloyd, with funding from RSNC and Sutton Place Heritage Trust. The remainder of the reserve was acquired in the early 1990s.
Size: 15.6 ha (38.5 acres).

Important Notice

Please note that until further notice, some of the paths on this nature reserve have been closed to public access. This is due to the presence of Ash Dieback in the trees.

Our detailed assessment of the number and health of the ash trees (and the risk they pose to site users) determined that making enough trees safe would cause too much harm to the nature reserve, especially the species that depend on ash. It would also reduce our ability to learn about any resilience these local trees might have.

Therefore, with wildlife in mind, we have decided to leave the trees standing- but that means we reluctantly have to reduce public access here until further notice. This decision will be kept under review and this site updated if the situation changes.

The path closures will be clearly marked on site and for your own safety we would ask that you respect the closures and instead continue to enjoy the other routes still available on the site.

For further information on Ash Dieback and the Trust’s policy on managing it, visit our Ash Dieback page.

A downloadable version of this leaflet is available for printing from here and a full colour leaflet for Coed Maidie B Goddard is also available here

Vegetation Tick Lists for the Ceredigion reserves are available to download as Excel xlsx or Excel xls 

Location and Access Notes

Public transport: The 460 bus departs from Cardigan regularly and stops in Llechryd, 0.5 km north east of the reserve.

Parking for 2-3 cars in front of field gate on north side of reserve. Waymarked footpaths; not accessible to wheelchairs.

Gatekeeper butterfly by Margaret Holland

Gatekeeper butterfly by Margaret Holland

Description: This relatively large reserve is a mosaic of woodland and grassland with wide, wooded gullies. Part of the woodland is mature secondary Ash woodland. There is also a large area of previously clearfelled conifer plantation, now over 20 year old regenerating Ash woodland, which has an attractive mossy ground flora with ferns and Wood Sorrel (4-5). In this woodland, bark scraping by the local population of Red Deer is clearly visible. One compartment of woodland remains conifer, and was host to a heronry until recently when ravens took over. Two planted specimens of Black Poplar grow in the meadows.

Many butterfly species use the meadows and woodland edges, including Common Blue, Small Skipper, Gatekeeper, Ringlet, Orange Tip, Comma and Speckled Wood among others.

A large Badger sett can be found in one of the wooded gullies, and Goldilocks Buttercup (4-5) also occurs along the edge of the reserve.

There are two ponds and two scrapes in one meadow where dragonflies and damselflies can be seen in the warmer months including Broadbodied Chaser, Common Darter and Emperor dragonflies and Large Red, Blue Tailed and Azure Blue damselflies.

Common Frogs, Common Toads, Slow Worms and Grass snakes all use the reserve.

Return to the Ceredigion Reserves page

Map of Coed Maidie B Goddard

 

Coed Penglanowen, Nanteos, Ceredigion

Treecreeper Bob Coyle

Grid References: O.S. Explorer map 213 Aberystwyth & Cwm Rheidol. Main entrance: SN611786, Site centre: SN609785
Tenure: The site was purchased in 1978 with grant aid from WWF, and with the help of donations in memory of the late Mr. E.H. Chater, in whose memory the reserve is dedicated.
Size: 5.3 ha (13.1 acres)

A downloadable version of this leaflet is available for printing here and a full colour leaflet is also available for Coed Penglanowen and Old Warren Hill here

Vegetation Tick Lists for the Ceredigion reserves are available to download as Excel xlsx or Excel xls 

Location and Access Notes

Public transport: The Aberystwyth circular town service stops in Penparcau, from where the reserve is just over a 2 km walk.

5 km south east of Aberystwyth, just south of, and adjacent to, Old Warren Hill NR.
From the B4340 to Trawsgoed take the minor road signposted Nanteos and park in the dedicated layby near the eastern entrance gate. There is one circular walk that includes two bridges, and a second path to the eastern end of the reserve. Inaccessible to wheelchairs.

Treecreeper Bob Coyle

Treecreeper Bob Coyle

Description: Mixed estate planted woodland.

The woodland canopy is varied, including species such as Ash, Beech, Sessile Oak, Holly, Sycamore, Wych Elm, and Grand Fir, typical of woods associated with large country houses in west Wales. Some of these specimens are extremely large, including the county’s tallest tree, a specimen of Sequoiadendron giganteum.

The diversity of mature trees provides an excellent habitat for hole nesting birds and all three woodpecker species have been recorded in the past, together with Nuthatch, Pied Flycatcher, Stock Dove, Tawny Owl, and Treecreeper.

The wood is rich in lichens and fungi, with the shade loving crustose lichen Enterographa crassa being particularly abundant, an indicator of the longevity of woodland cover on this site. In the early summer the western end of the reserve is a spectacular carpet of Bluebells (4-6) and locally abundant Wood Anemone (3-4).

Return to the Ceredigion Reserves page

 

Coed Simdde Lwyd, Rheidol Valley, Ceredigion

wood anenome L Maiden

Grid References: O.S. Explorer map 213 Aberystwyth & Cwm Rheidol. Main entrance: SN712787, alternatives at SN716785 and SN718783. Site centre: SN717786.
Status: The site is part of a notified SSSI and NNR, and in turn is part of the European Natura 2000 site, the Rheidol Woods & Gorges Special Area of Conservation (SAC).
Tenure: Purchased by the Trust in 1980 with funds from the Dyfed Wildlife Appeal, and grant aid from NCC and WWF, with various additions over later years.
Size: 36.3 ha (89.7 acres).

A downloadable version of this leaflet is available for printing here and a full colour leaflet for Coed Simdde Lwyd is available here.

Vegetation Tick Lists for the Ceredigion reserves are available to download as Excel xlsx or Excel xls 

Location and Access Notes

Public transport: None

There is space for a single car by the main gate, adjacent to Glynrheidol Farm. Footpaths, many steep; not accessible to wheelchairs.

Description: Ancient upland Oak woodland.

wood anenome L Maiden

Wood anenome L Maiden

The reserve is a Sessile Oak wood on a steep south-facing slope. The canopy is almost pure Sessile Oak, with Downy and Silver Birch dominant in some areas. A stream, at the eastern end, drains steeply into the Afon Rheidol. Here the canopy is more diverse with additional species such as Alder, Ash, Blackthorn (3-4), Small-leaved Lime, Sycamore, Wild Cherry (4-5), and Wych Elm.

The ground flora is typical of acid woodland in mid Wales, and includes Bluebell (4-6), Common Cow-wheat (6-8), Common Violet (4-6), Foxglove (7-8), Sheep’s-bit (5-9), Opposite-leaved Golden Saxifrage (3-5), Primrose (2-5), Wood Anemone (3-5), Yellow Pimpernel (5-9), Heather (8-10), and Bilberry (4-6).

Nine species of fern are recorded, including Wilson’s Filmy Fern (6-7), which occurs in small quantity on the steep rock on the southwest side of the stream, along with the calcicolous moss Ctenidium molluscum and the prominent leafy liverwort, Bazzania tribolata.

Breeding birds include species typical of this type of woodland, such as Pied Flycatcher, Redstart, and Wood Warbler. Buzzard, Jackdaw, Jay, Long-tailed Tit, Raven, and Robin are also regularly seen. Badgers use the reserve extensively, and Brown Hares use the woodland edges.

 

Return to the Ceredigion Reserves page

Map of Coed Simdde Lwyd

Cors Ian, Lledrod, Ceredigion

Water vole Margaret Holland

Grid References: O.S. Explorer map 199 Lampeter. Main entrance: SN669696, Site centre: SN675696
Tenure: Cors Ian was purchased for the Trust by Mrs Marlene Matthews in memory of her son, a student at Aberystwyth University.
Size: 15.4 ha (38.1 acres)

A downloadable version of this leaflet is available for printing here and a full colour leaflet is also available for Cors Ian here

Vegetation Tick Lists for the Ceredigion reserves are available to download as Excel xlsx or Excel xls 

Location and Access Notes

Public transport: The T21 Aberystwyth to Tregaron stops in Tynygraig, a 4 km walk along narrow lanes to the reserve or the 585 Aberystwyth to Lampeter, stops in Lledrod, a 3.5km walk to reserve.

Off road parking. Not accessible to wheelchairs. A public footpath runs along the southern boundary and permissive paths lead to the hill top.

Description: Valley mire and gorsey hillside. Fen plants and Water Voles.

Water vole Margaret Holland

Water vole Margaret Holland

Cors Ian is an upland valley mire with an interesting mosaic of habitats, hiding a wide array of marsh plants. Amongst the Molinia tufts and rushes a small population of Water Voles is thriving, nesting above ground with their territory extending some way from the central overgrown streambed.

Resident birds on the mire include breeding Grasshopper Warblers and Reed Buntings, with Stonechats, Whinchats and Meadow Pipits on the drier heath. The old hedgerows provide nest sites for Redstarts, Tits and Wrens whilst around the old stables are nesting Spotted and Pied Flycatchers, Swallows and Garden Warblers in the scrub area. Birds of prey that can be seen include Buzzard, Red Kite and occasional Hen Harrier, with corvids including Raven.

Dragonflies, notably the Keeled Skimmer, thrive wherever there is surface water but the most dramatic Golden Ringed Dragonfly can be found hunting amongst the gorse. There are many commoner species of butterflies but also the Marsh Violets support a small population of Small Pearl-bordered Fritillaries.

Return to the Ceredigion Reserves page

Cors Ian map

Cwm Clettwr, Tre’r-ddôl, Ceredigion

Pied flycatcher by Margaret Holland

Grid References: O.S. Explorer map OL23 Cadair Idris & Llyn Tegid. Main entrance: SN666922, Site centre: SN666921
Status: Part of the reserve is notified SSSI
Tenure: The current area is managed in agreement with the Forestry Commission under a 21 year lease dated 1998.
Size: 16.4 ha (40.50 acres)

A downloadable version of this leaflet is available for printing from here and a full colour leaflet for Cwm Clettwr is available here.

Vegetation Tick Lists for the Ceredigion reserves are available to download as Excel xlsx or Excel xls 

Location and Access Notes

Public transport: Bus service The X28/T2 Aberystwyth to Machynlleth regular service stops in Tre’r ddol.

16 km northeast of Aberystwyth, 13 km southwest of Machynlleth. Heading north through Tre’r-ddôl, take the small road on the right just after Soar Chapel (SN659922). Off road parking on the right near the top of the hill. Public and permissive footpaths traverse the reserve.

Pied flycatcher by Margaret Holland

Pied flycatcher by Margaret Holland

Description: The reserve can be divided into two principal areas, a large area of regenerating broadleaf woodland with heath pockets, and the section of more mature broadleaf woodland that is notified SSSI. The regenerating/heathy area was previously Hemlock plantation, which was clearfelled in 2000. This is now dominated by Heather and Gorse with significant Birch regeneration. Some broadleaf species have also been planted to encourage the regeneration process.

In the mature broadleaf compartment, the canopy is dominated by Sessile Oak, which show signs of being old coppice, the bark probably being used in tanning. The herb layer is a typically poor calcifuge flora.

A proportion of the wood is almost pure Ash on the more base rich soils and the ground flora is much more diverse including such plants as Dog’s Mercury (2-4), Toothwort (3-5), Smooth-stalked Sedge (6), Sweet Woodruff (5-6), and Yellow Archangel (4-6).

Due to the locally humid atmosphere, Polypody Fern (7-8) grows on many of the trees, and although the reserve is rich in flowering plants, ferns such as Oak Fern (7-8), and Beech Fern (6-8) occur. It is also particularly rich in bryophytes and lichens.

The breeding bird assemblage, typical of these sorts of habitats, includes Dipper, Grey Wagtail, Nuthatch, Pied Flycatcher, Redstart, Sparrowhawk and Wood Warbler.

Return to the Ceredigion Reserves page

 

CC map

Llyn Eiddwen, Bronnant, Ceredigion

Grid References: O.S. Explorer map 199 Lampeter. Main entrance: SN608672, Site centre: SN607674
Status: The lake bed is an NNR. The surrounding land forms part of a larger SSSI.
Tenure: The majority of the reserve has been owned (freehold) since the early 1980s. 10.8 ha are leased from the Crown Estate Commissioners.
Size: 55.2 ha (136.3 acres).

Please note that watersports are not permitted and fishing is by permit only.

A printable version of the leaflet is available to download from here and a full colour leaflet for Llyn Eiddwen is available here

Vegetation Tick Lists for the Ceredigion reserves are available to download as Excel xlsx or Excel xls 

Location and Access Notes

Public transport: The 588 Aberystwyth/Lampeter bus service goes through Trefenter (Mon-Sat). The 585 Aberystwyth/Lampeter bus service passes through Bronnant regularly (Mon-Sat), a 4-5 km walk from the lake.

3.5 km west of Bronnant. Roadside parking just north of cattle grid, on minor road to Trefenter. Public footpath along ridge or access along western shore only; not accessible for wheelchairs.

Description: Oligotrophic-mesotrophic lake, upland heathland and mire. Natural upland lake, 300 m above sea level.

The lake is some 10.5 ha in extent with a maximum depth of c. 7 m. The site is remarkable for its flora, supporting abundant stands of Water Lobelia (7-9) with carpets of Shoreweed (6-9), Spring Quillwort and Quillwort, and Awlwort (6-7) here at one of its southernmost stations in the United Kingdom, where it forms a curious association with Floating Water-plantain (4-8). At the southern end, there are extensive beds of emergent Bottle Sedge (5-8) and Water Horsetail which grade into the bog vegetation at the top end of the lake dominated by Cotton grass (4-9) and bog moss Sphagnum sp.

The lake is important locally for wintering wildfowl, including Coot, Mallard, Pochard, Teal, and Wigeon with part of the flock of Whooper Swan which winter in central Ceredigion. Black-throated Diver and Green-winged Teal have visited the lake in recent years. The site holds a good variety of aquatic invertebrates including Keeled Skimmer, and the sponge-feeding caddis fly Ceraclea fulva being of particular interest. Water Voles inhabit the vegetated shoreline. The lake waters host populations of native Brown Trout, Pike, Minnow and Three-spined Stickleback.

The surrounding area of upland heathland and acidic grassland is typical of this part of mid Wales and is common land. Most is an unimproved sward of Mat Grass (3-6) which grades into Mat Grass-Bilberry (4-6) heath with Heath Bedstraw (5-9), Sheep’s Fescue (5-7) and Tormentil (4-9). There are also areas of Heather (8-10).

North of the lake is small valley mire complex with a good cover of Bog Mosses with much Cotton Grass and also Bog Asphodel (6-8), Cranberry (5-7), and Round-leaved Sundew (6-8). HOWEVER BEWARE VERY SOFT GROUND IN PLACES.

Return to the Ceredigion Reserves page

Llyn Fanod, Bronnant, Ceredigion

white water lily by Amy Lewis

Grid References: O.S. Explorer map 199 Lampeter. Main entrance: SN604645, Site centre: SN604645
Status: The site forms part of the Cors Llyn Farch a Llyn Fanod SSSI.
Tenure: The reserve, which only consists of the extreme northern section of the lake, was purchased from the University of Wales in 1983.
Size: 0.2 ha (0.5 acre).

A downloadable version of the leaflet for printing is available from here

Location and Access Notes

Public transport: The 585 Aberystwyth/Lampeter bus service passes through Bronnant regularly, c. 5 km walk from the lake.

Turn north at SN605633 on the B4577 Aberarth to Tregaron road, after just over 1 km the lake is visible on the west side of the road. Or from Llyn Eiddwen, turn left and then first right. Roadside parking at crossroads, SN607646 and walk westwards along track. Access available along the whole shore. PLEASE KEEP STRICTLY TO THE SHORELINE. Inaccessible for wheelchairs.

Description: Natural upland lake. Aquatic plants, dragonflies.

white water lily by Amy Lewis

white water lily by Amy Lewis

The lake which extends for 4.5 ha, may be described aptly as a sister to Llyn Eiddwen about 2 km away. It is a more sheltered locality, with a steep sloping basin mire at the southern end and heathland on the steep bank nearest the footpath.

A range of aquatic plants occur, including Water Lobelia (7-9), Quillwort, Shoreweed (6-9), and a few isolated plants of Awlwort (6-7) at probably its most southerly location in Great Britain. In high summer there is a spectacular display of White Water Lily (6-9) and Yellow Water Lily (7-8) which covers much of the southern end of the lake.

The lake is particularly good for dragonflies, damselflies, and caddis flies, as well as a few aquatic Lepidoptera.

Return to the Ceredigion Reserves page

 

Old Warren Hill, Nanteos, Ceredigion

Blackcap by Amy Lewis

Grid References: O.S. Explorer map 213 Aberystwyth & Cwm Rheidol.Main entrance: SN612786, Site centre: SN614788
Status: The iron age hillfort is a Scheduled Ancient Monument.
Tenure: The freehold was purchased in 1973 with grant aid from WWF.
Size: 8.3 ha (20.5 acre).

A downloadable version of this leaflet for printing can be downloaded from here and a full colour leaflet is also available for Old Warren Hill and Coed Penglanowen

Vegetation Tick Lists for the Ceredigion reserves are available to download as Excel xlsx or Excel xls 

Location and Access Notes

Public transport: The Aberystwyth circular town service stops in Penparcau, from where the reserve is just over a 2 km walk.

5 km south east of Aberystwyth. Access from the minor road signposted Nanteos from the B4340 to Trawsgoed. Park in the dedicated layby near the entrance gate, just west of Nanteos Lodge. Inaccessible to wheelchairs. A circular footpath leads round the reserve and is steep in places.

Blackcap by Amy Lewis

Blackcap by Amy Lewis

Description: Mixed woodland and stream on slopes of Old Warren Hill Iron Age hillfort.

The reserve comprises varied woodland covering the top and steep western slopes of Old Warren Hill. A stream running through the wooded dingle forms the western boundary. There is a large Badger sett in the ramparts of the hillfort.

The canopy is made up of a diverse mixture of species including Sessile Oak, Beech, Ash, Sycamore, English Elm, Wych Elm, Silver Birch, Sweet Chestnut, Scots Pine and Norway Spruce. The ground flora includes a spectacular display of Bluebells (4-6) in the early summer.

The diversity of tree species and the physical structure of the woodland provide an ideal habitat for a variety of birds including Blackcap, Garden Warbler, Great Spotted Woodpecker, Pied Flycatcher, Redstart, and Willow Warbler. Birds of prey are frequently seen soaring over the hill side, Buzzard and Sparrowhawk are the most frequent with occasional visits by Kestrel and Red Kite. Large numbers of Ravens also congregate over the reserve in the early autumn.

The wood is particularly rich in epiphytic lichens and fungi, the latter probably benefiting from the large number of decaying wind-blown trees.

Return to the Ceredigion Reserves page