Wildlife Blog

Red Squirrel by Graham Eaton

Red Squirrels – in Rhandirmwyn One Day?

In an exciting new development, Welsh Government funding has been awarded to us helping support community action across the red squirrel focal area. The funding from Environment Wales, a partnership in the voluntary sector that supports voluntary action to protect and improve the environment, has enabled  WTSWW to roll out a Trap Loan Scheme on behalf of the Mid Wales Red Squirrel Partnership (MWRSP). Red squirrel in hold for recording biometrics The Trap Loan Scheme is part of a wider effort to reduce the population of grey squirrels in mid Wales, as they are detrimental to the survival of the native red squirrel. …
Seal monitoring on Skomer Island - a marked pup

Seal Pupping Season on Skomer Island

The relative quiet of August on Skomer Island allows us to catch our breath after the sea bird season. But our seal cows are busy looking for sheltered rocky coves, and even caves, in which to give birth. As soon as the first pup is born, the island team begin daily monitoring of the edges of the island, looking for new pups and counting the seals on their favourite low tide haul out spots. Seal monitoring on Skomer – the fun part of the job We were blessed by a calm and warm September, and our daily rounds to check for seal pups were a great excuse to walk the island looking for migrant birds and spend time watching the pups and their anxious mothers.…
The well named Golden Waxcap

Wonderful Waxcaps (and funny looks)

As a gateway into identifying Fungi you can’t get much better than Waxcaps.   Not only are they easy to spot, being brightly coloured and found on open unimproved grassland, but they are (relatively) easy to identify using a simple key (there are several available online). The well named Golden Waxcap I have also noticed as I try to ID the waxcaps at Taf Fechan that there is a truly spectacular scope for generating “funny” looks from passing people as you first smell your waxcap (some waxcaps have characteristic smells one smells of Honey another of Cedar wood) and then even “funnier” looks as you kiss your waxcap.  …
Snippets from Bridgend

Snippets from Bridgend

Bridgend Local Group are a very active bunch and you can get a flavour of their antics and their humour in this edition of their Snippets Magazine (4.2MB). Here’s one of the articles from this edition of Snippets. Little Hens of the Summer Recently a friend from England remarked that the Welsh language “obviously” wouldn’t have any names for the species of butterfly. As it happened, some while ago I had compiled a list of all the Welsh names of the British species given in the Academy dictionary, so I was able to assure him that this was not the case.…
Oak Bracket – characterised by the weeping of amber liquid

Fascinatingly frustrating fungi

Permit me to start with a rather cheap gag.   The first rule of fungi is that many of them cannot be identified in the field.   The second rule of fungi (and you’re waaay ahead of me here I can tell) is that many of them cannot be identified in the field.   This is highly frustrating (especially if you have a list orientated mind) but nature has obviously decreed that there shall be umpteen little brown fungi that look like they should be unique but sadly aren’t.…
Lapwing Ian Rose

Lapwing Champions needed at Parc Slip!

Lapwing Ian Rose The Lapwing is an iconic farmland bird which has undergone drastic declines in populations as a result of loss of breeding habitat. Today the lapwing is a U.K. and Wales priority species requiring urgent positive action. Over the next few months, we will be working hard to reverse the decline at Parc Slip Nature Reserve, through a series of habitat creation and management projects. These will include the creation of wetland scrapes and cryptic nesting sites to the appropriate management of wetlands, meadows and arable fields.…
A nectaring Comma by Graham Watkeys

Buzzing Ivy

We’ve all done it, some of us wish we didn’t, but we all do. That buzzing noise somewhere behind your left ear causes that involuntary freeze and cringe (with optional arm flapping) response followed by trying to see behind your left ear without moving anything. A nectaring Comma by Graham Watkeys It took me a while to realise that the loud insistent buzz wasn’t coming from behind my ear but from the Ivy covered tree a few metres away, the whole tree was buzzing.…