News

Door to Door Recruiters – Across South & West Wales

Looking to supplement your income or pension? Wanting to work flexible hours? We welcome applications from all ages to our brilliant membership team. Location: Across south and west Wales Hours: 12-15 per week. Permanent, seasonal. Subject to completion of a probationary period. The role: We are looking for people to join our membership recruiting team to spread the message about our work and sign up new members.It’s a simple soft-sell, two step approach. You hand out recruitment booklets to interested people at their houses and on a prearranged day you go back and pick up the booklet and sign up any interested parties.…

Polecat at Ffrwd Farm Mire reserve

We have caught some exciting footage in a camera trap set up at Ffrwd Farm Mire reserve, our wetland reserve near Kidwelly. The motion sensor camera was set up to monitor for mink as part of our mink control programme, an important aspect supporting the NRW lead ‘water vole project’. Through this over 100 water voles were released last summer. On the camera we were treated to sights of polecat (a new species for the reserve), otter, fox, and snipe.…

Mostly scrub

Our winter work programme is drawing to a close with spring on the doorstep. Coed Maidie B Goddard has had a lot of work done on it this winter but there is still plenty to do so we spent a day clearing some pretty large patches of brambles from the top meadow. We’ve also cleared blackthorn and brambles at Woodland management Caeau Llety Cybi, birch and willow from the rhos pasture at Pennar Fawr, willow and bramble from the meadow edge at Rhos Marion and willow and birch from the bog at Cors Ian to improve the watervole habitat.…

Pwll Waun Cynon C.1820

You don’t need a flux capacitor to time travel you just need a hay rake and a large field like this one at Pwll Waun Cynon. Hay gathering at Pwll Waun Cynon by Graham Watkeys So a quick recap on meadow management: most meadow species need low nutrients and relatively poor soils to thrive and when these nutrients start to build up they quickly get outcompeted by the more vigorous grasses reducing biodiversity so removing cuttings (which rot down increasing soil nutrients) from the site after mowing is essential.…

Fighting fire with fire

This week we teamed up with the South Wales Fire Service to carry out a controlled burn at Y Gweira Nature Reserve.  The reserve is part of the Llantrisant Common & Pastures Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), a fantastic mosaic of marshy grassland, wet heath and raised bogs, which has been grazed by the Freemen of Llantrisant for centuries. Y Gweira Nature Reserve sits just outside the Common, and for this reason has probably received less grazing over the years than the rest of the SSSI, resulting in a dense thatch of rush and moorgrass developing. …

The Dranges Marsh Fritillary Habitat Recovery Project

It felt like we were doing battle with the weather and ground conditions but as winter progressed so did the SITA Trust funded project to restore the habitat for Marsh Fritillary butterflies at The Dranges, Bishopston. February 2015 saw the completion of the external fencing, a total of 2500m. Internal boundary fencing was commenced and completed a total of 1470m. 11 gates and 2 stiles were installed, 3 existing gates on the external boundary were also rehung. 4 swing gates were also installed where the fencing crossed watercourses.…

A year of monitoring birds at Teifi Marshes

As the days get longer and migrant birds start to head back from warmer places, the Teifi Ringing Group have been looking back over the 2014 highlights of bird ringing on the Teifi Marshes. This reserve is a haven for wildlife on the edge of Cardigan. This work is important because long-term monitoring of bird populations is needed in order to conserve them effectively. Ringing birds helps to find out if numbers are stable, decreasing or increasing. If there is a change in numbers, particularly a decrease, we need to know why.…

Providing a home for otters at Coed y Bedw Nature Reserve

Otters are one of the UK’s largest carnivores and are an unusual example of an animal whose fortunes have dramatically improved over the last few decades. They have recovered following years of persecution and the effect of harmful chemicals entering the water system. Since the 1960s otters have bounced back so that now they can be found in nearly every river catchment in Wales. Otter by J Maiden Primarily feeding on fish they occupy large territories encompassing rivers, lakes and other wetlands such as reedbeds.…